Cover image for National Wildlife Federation field guide to insects and spiders & related species of North America
Title:
National Wildlife Federation field guide to insects and spiders & related species of North America
Publication Information:
New York : Sterling Pub., c2007.
ISBN:
9781402741531
Physical Description:
496 p. : ill. (some col.), map ; 20 cm.
Language:
English
Contents:
Introduction -- Insects, spiders, and people -- Scope and arrangement of this guide -- Classification -- What is an insect? -- The body plan of insects and entognaths -- Growth and development of entognaths and insects -- Metamorphosis -- Synopsis of North American hexapod orders -- Class entognatha -- Class insecta -- What is a spider? -- The body plan of spiders -- Synopsis of common North American arachnid orders -- Other arthropods -- Myriapoda : centipedes, millipedes, and kin -- Crustacea : crayfish, shrimps, pillbugs, and kin -- Natural history of insects, spiders, and their kin -- Feeding behavior -- Defense behavior -- Conserving the silent majority -- Finding insects, spiders, and their kin -- Where to look -- Making an identification -- About the guide -- Entognaths -- Proturans (order Protura) -- Springtails (order Collembola) -- Diplurans (order Diplura) -- Insects -- Jumping bristletails (order Microcoryphia) -- Silverfish and firebrats (order Thysanura) -- Mayflies (order Ephemeroptera) -- Dragonflies and damselflies (order Odonata) -- Cockroaches (order Blattodea) -- Termites (order Isoptera).

Mantids (order Mantodea) -- Rockcrawlers (order Grylloblattodea) -- Earwigs (order Dermaptera) -- Stoneflies (order Plecoptera) -- Grasshoppers, crickets, and katydids (order Orthoptera) -- Stick insects (order Phasmida) -- Webspinners (order Embioptera) -- Zorapterans (order Zoraptera) -- Barklice and booklice (order Psocoptera) -- Chewing and sucking lice (order Phthiraptera) -- True bugs, cicadas, hoppers, and kin (order Hemiptera) -- Thrips (order Thysanoptera) -- Dobsonflies, fishflies, and alderflies (order Megaloptera) -- Snakeflies (order Raphidioptera) -- Antlions, lacewings, mantidflies, and owlflies (order Neuroptera) -- Beetles (order Coleoptera) -- Twisted-winged parasites (order Strepsiptera) -- Scorpionflies and hangingflies (order Mecoptera) -- Fleas (order Siphonaptera) -- Flies (order Diptera) -- Caddisflies (order Trichoptera) -- Butterflies and moths (order Lepidoptera) -- Ants, bees, and wasps (order Hymenoptera) -- Arachnids -- Spiders (order Araneae) -- Harvestmen (order Opiliones) -- Scorpions (order Scorpiones).

Pseudoscorpions (order Pseudoscorpiones) -- Windscorpions (order Solifugae) -- Tailless whipscorpions (order Amblypygi) -- Whipscorpions (order Uropygi) -- Ticks and mites (order Acari) -- Other arthropods -- Centipedes (Class Chilopoda) -- Millipedes (class Diplopoda) -- Fairy, brine, tadpole and clam shrimps, and water fleas (class Branchiopoda) -- Malacostracans (class Malacostraca) -- How-to guides -- Starting an insect and spider collection -- Keeping insects and spiders in captivity -- Planting an arthropod garden -- Macrophotography -- Appendices -- Acknowledgments -- Staff for this guide -- Illustration sources -- Photo credits -- Glossary -- Pronunciation guide -- Orders of arthropods in North America -- Endangered and threatened insects and arachnids -- Insect zoos and butterfly houses -- Resources and references -- Index.
Abstract:
Identifies "more than 940 species ... More than 2,000 close-up color photographs ... reveal the field marks that distinguish each creature, and the ... text that accompanies each image describes the range, habitat, life cycle, and behavior ... [Includes] information on starting a collection, planting an arthropod garden, keeping insects and spiders in captivity, and learning the techniques of macro photography."--Publisher description.

Also includes material on proturans, springtails, diplurans, harvestmen, scorpions, ticks, mites, centipedes, millipedes, crayfish, pillbugs, fairy, brine, tadpole, and clam shrimps, water fleas, and malacostracans.
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Book 595.7097 EVA 1 .SOURCE. INGRAM
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Book 595.7097 EVA 1 .SOURCE. 1/11 H
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Book QL473.E93 2007 1
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Book QL473.E93 2007 1
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Book QL473.E93 2007 1
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On Order

Summary

Summary

National Wildlife Federation's new all-photographic field guide to North American insects, spiders, and related species, is the most up-to-date of its kind, and lets both amateur and expert naturalists identify more than 940 species quickly and accurately. More than 2,000 close-up color photographs by leading nature photographers reveal the field marks that distinguish each creature, and the clear and concise text that accompanies each image describes the range, habitat, life cycle, and behavior. Budding entomologists will be inspired to explore further with the detailed information on starting a collection, planting an arthropod garden, keeping insects and spiders in captivity, and learning the techniques of macro photography. The unique waterproof cover makes it ideal for use outdoors.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

Although illustrating less than 1 percent of the North American fauna, this guide presents a glimpse of the incredible array of colors, shapes, and forms found within the phylum Arthropoda. Evans (Smithsonian Institution) introduces morphology, development, and general life history, and offers a "Synopsis of Hexapod Orders" that will help users place an unknown specimen into a basic group. Over 380 pages of color photographs follow, most showing two or three different species. The species chosen exhibit a nice range, with larger orders that contain large or showy species getting the lion's share of attention (moths and butterflies, 94 pages; beetles, 68 pages). Smaller orders, or those containing very small species, are presented on one or two pages. This is not really a shortcoming since many users may not have a microscope, and most tiny specimens will not be identifiable in the field. Although coverage of other arthropod groups such as spiders, mites, ticks, centipedes, millipedes, and crustaceans is not extensive, the book does provide diagnostic images and other helpful information concerning these less popular groups. Overall, this is a very good guide that will find a wide audience, particularly among amateur naturalists. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-/upper-level undergraduates, professionals/practitioners, and general readers. P. K. Lago University of Mississippi