Cover image for Encyclopedia of Cold War espionage, spies, and secret operations
Title:
Encyclopedia of Cold War espionage, spies, and secret operations
Edition:
New, updated ed.
Publication Information:
New York : Enigma Books, 2009.
ISBN:
9781936274260
Physical Description:
1 online resource (xxx, 572 p.)
Language:
English
Contents:
Reviewing the literature on Cold War espionage -- Encyclopedia of Cold War espionage, spies, and secret operations -- Glossary -- Chronology -- List of heads of intelligence.
Abstract:
From the Publisher: The cold war officially lasted from 1945 to 1991; however, many operations and individual spies often are found beyond these dates, with some previously unknown operations and names having surfaced only recently. Based on all the latest research, the core part of the book consists of over 330 individual entries that include biographical accounts of the lives and operations the individual spies and secret agents took part in. In support of the entries, the book provides important useful tools: a complete chronology of significant espionage activities; a glossary of key terms and figures providing additional background to the entries; references to other sources, either in print or electronic formats; and extensive cross-references for all entries. Reaching as far back as 1917 and the Soviet seizure of power in Russia, Encyclopedia of Cold War Espionage, Spies, and Secret Operations covers the entire range of Soviet Bloc and Western espionage. The book explores in depth the critical cold war years, 1945-1991, alongside all the extended ramifications of espionage, up to the spies and operations most recently unveiled. The bulk of the entries centers on the cold war conflict of the United States and NATO-allied countries against the USSR and Communist China, though many other countries were involved in cold war espionage operations as well. Selected fictional characters and operations created by John LeCarre, Ian Fleming, and Robert Littell are also included in a separate section due to the image, accurate or imaginary, of the intelligence operative that was either reviled by the professionals or enthusiastically embraced by the general public.
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Summary

Summary

The cold war officially lasted from 1945 to 1991; however, many operations and individual spies often are found beyond these dates, with some previously unknown operations and names having surfaced only recently. Based on all the latest research, the core part of the book consists of over 330 individual entries that include biographical accounts of the lives and operations the individual spies and secret agents took part in.

In support of the entries, the book provides important useful tools: a complete chronology of significant espionage activities; a glossary of key terms and figures providing additional background to the entries; references to other sources, either in print or electronic formats; and extensive cross-references for all entries. Reaching as far back as 1917 and the Soviet seizure of power in Russia, Encyclopedia of Cold War Espionage, Spies, and Secret Operations covers the entire range of Soviet Bloc and Western espionage. The book explores in depth the critical cold war years, 1945--1991, alongside all the extended ramifications of espionage, up to the spies and operations most recently unveiled.

The bulk of the entries centers on the cold war conflict of the United States and NATO-allied countries against the USSR and Communist China, though many other countries were involved in cold war espionage operations as well. Selected fictional characters and operations created by John LeCarr#65533;, Ian Fleming, and Robert Littell are also included in a separate section due to the image, accurate or imaginary, of the intelligence operative that was either reviled by the professionals or enthusiastically embraced by the general public.


Reviews 2

Booklist Review

This intriguing encyclopedia looks at key players in cold war espionage activities, reviews their activities during the cold war period, and explains what occurred because of those activities. Daniel Ellsberg, Alger Hiss, Christine Keeler, Joseph McCarthy, Lee Harvey Oswald, and Ethel and Julius Rosenberg are among those who are treated. Though most of the approximately 300 key entries cover individuals, some examine events and operations. The author's definition of cold war is broad and includes more than the standard U.S. versus Soviet Union perspective. The encyclopedia's scope encompasses spies and operations prior to World War II and beyond the fall of the Berlin Wall and collapse of the Soviet Union. The reader will find information dealing with more than 40 countries. Trahair also treats some aspects of fictional espionage, in entries such as Bond, James and Le Carre, John. Most of the entries include short citations of sources, helpful starting points for more in-depth research. The volume also contains a list of entries sorted by general subject, a glossary, and a cold war chronology. A quibble is that very few cryptographers are included. Herbert Yardley's work in the U.S., as the creator of the American code-breaking agency, could have been noted. Yardley was disgraced in U.S. spy circles after the publication of his book The Black Chamber. He worked in Canada during the early cold war years and helped Canada develop its cypher skills. A solid piece of work, the encyclopedia would be a good choice for the public library where there is interest in this subject area. Colleges and universities with programs in modern history, government policy, and security and intelligence will find it a good introductory source. --Terri Tomchyshyn Copyright 2004 Booklist


Choice Review

The Cold War was a very active period for international espionage. Many cases made sensational headlines, while others are only now seeing the light of day. This revised edition (1st, CH, Apr'05, 42-4407), by Trahair (La Trobe U., Australia) and Miller (senior editor/publisher, Enigma Books), features over 350 main entries (versus 300 in the earlier edition). While it certainly covers secret operations and organizations, most of the text concerns individuals; human intelligence is still the most important aspect of an intellectual field that seems dominated--if not distorted--by modern technology. Each entry usually has several sources listed at the end. Numerous, helpful cross-references and see also notes appear throughout. The chronology stretches from March 1917 to Oct. 2008 but, disappointingly, gives months only, not days. Also featured are a long glossary and lists of the heads of the MI6, Soviet secret police and SVR (Foreign Intelligence Service), and the CIA. Readers new to this subject will want to read the essay that reviews the important literature in this field. Those interested in the topic will also want to know about Nigel West's earlier Historical Dictionary of Cold War Counterintelligence (2007). This reasonably priced, informative edition is suitable for public and academic libraries, especially those that do not already own the first one. Plans are already in place for another revision. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-level undergraduates through faculty/researchers; general readers. D. K. Blewett College of DuPage