Cover image for Jacqueline Kennedy historic conversations on life with John F. Kennedy : interviews with Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., 1964
Title:
Jacqueline Kennedy historic conversations on life with John F. Kennedy : interviews with Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., 1964
Edition:
Unabridged ed.
Publication Information:
New York : Hyperion, c2011.
ISBN:
9781401324254
Physical Description:
8 sound discs : digital ; 4 3/4 in.
Language:
English
General Note:
Audio CD.
Abstract:
Shortly after President John F. Kennedy's assassination, with a nation deep in mourning and the world looking on in stunned disbelief, Jacqueline Kennedy found the strength to set aside her own personal grief for the sake of posterity and begin the task of documenting and preserving her husband's legacy. In January of 1964, she and Robert F. Kennedy approved a planned oral-history project that would capture their first-hand accounts of the late President as well as the recollections of those closest to him throughout his extraordinary political career. For the rest of her life, the famously private Jacqueline Kennedy steadfastly refused to discuss her memories of those years, but beginning that March, she fulfilled her obligation to future generations of Americans by sitting down with historian Arthur Schlesinger, Jr., and recording an astonishingly detailed and unvarnished account of her experiences and impressions as the wife and confidante of John F. Kennedy. The tapes of those sessions were then sealed and later deposited in the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum upon its completion, in accordance with Mrs. Kennedy's wishes.
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CD Book 973.922092 KENNEDY 1 .CIRCNOTE. *****8 CD'S*****
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1:CTWAV 92 KENNEDY, JACQUELINE 1 .CIRCNOTE. 8 compact discs
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Summary

Summary

To mark John F. Kennedy's centennial, celebrate the life and legacy of the 35th President of the United States.
In 1964, Jacqueline Kennedy recorded seven historic interviews about her life with John F. Kennedy. Now, for the first time, they can be read in this deluxe, illustrated eBook.
Shortly after President John F. Kennedy's assassination, with a nation deep in mourning and the world looking on in stunned disbelief, Jacqueline Kennedy found the strength to set aside her own personal grief for the sake of posterity and begin the task of documenting and preserving her husband's legacy. In January of 1964, she and Robert F. Kennedy approved a planned oral-history project that would capture their first-hand accounts of the late President as well as the recollections of those closest to him throughout his extraordinary political career. For the rest of her life, the famously private Jacqueline Kennedy steadfastly refused to discuss her memories of those years, but beginning that March, she fulfilled her obligation to future generations of Americans by sitting down with historian Arthur Schlesinger, Jr., and recording an astonishingly detailed and unvarnished account of her experiences and impressions as the wife and confidante of John F. Kennedy. The tapes of those sessions were then sealed and later deposited in the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum upon its completion, in accordance with Mrs. Kennedy's wishes.

The resulting eight and a half hours of material comprises a unique and compelling record of a tumultuous era, providing fresh insights on the many significant people and events that shaped JFK's presidency but also shedding new light on the man behind the momentous decisions. Here are JFK's unscripted opinions on a host of revealing subjects, including his thoughts and feelings about his brothers Robert and Ted, and his take on world leaders past and present, giving us perhaps the most informed, genuine, and immediate portrait of John Fitzgerald Kennedy we shall ever have. Mrs. Kennedy's urbane perspective, her candor, and her flashes of wit also give us our clearest glimpse into the active mind of a remarkable First Lady.

In conjunction with the fiftieth anniversary of President Kennedy's Inauguration, Caroline Kennedy and the Kennedy family are now releasing these beautifully restored recordings on CDs with accompanying transcripts. Introduced and annotated by renowned presidential historian Michael Beschloss, these interviews will add an exciting new dimension to our understanding and appreciation of President Kennedy and his time and make the past come alive through the words and voice of an eloquent eyewitness to history.


Reviews 3

School Library Journal Review

Jacqueline Kennedy courageously granted a series of interviews to historian Arthur Schlesinger, Jr., in 1964 while still mourning the loss of her beloved husband, coping with the abrupt dismantling of her life, and preparing to raise two young children on her own. The tapes of those sessions were then sealed and later deposited in the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum. Now, their daughter, Caroline Kennedy, has published the recordings and transcripts to coincide with the 50th anniversary of President Kennedy's inauguration, giving us a rare, firsthand glimpse into the personal stories behind the public personae and political events that formed our country from 1953 to 1963. Through Jackie's eyes we see JFK as a curious and voracious reader, a decisive leader, and an "idealist without illusions." We see him as a self-confident, but not egocentric man, who related to everyone easily and valued his wife, children, and family life. This book and eight CDs bring a critical phase of American history to life-for those who lived through it and for those who have only a hazy idea of the Camelot years. Barbara Stripling, former director of library services for the New York City schools, recently joined the faculty of Syracuse University's School of Information Studies and is a candidate for American Library Association president. (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Kirkus Review

Ms. and other movement publications). But the real defense comes through her words here, gathered only a few months after JFK's assassination. They reveal a nimble if worried mind. Personally, JFK wasn't the easiest man to live with, due in part to the sour stomach born of nerves and "those awful years campaigningliving on a milkshake and a hot dog," as well as the terrible general health that he bore stoically in public but that caused him private agony. Jackie is shrewd in her assessments about people: Stewart Udall rose to head the Interior Department, she notes, because he delivered Arizona to JFK in the 1960 election--but then emerged as a real leader. She also provides on-the-spot commentary about unfolding world events, such as the ever-more-urgent specter of Vietnam and a divided Germany (the only ambassadors JFK "really disliked" were those from Germany and Pakistan). All politics is local--and personal. These interviews are invaluable in providing a fly-on-the-wall view of life in the Kennedy White House--and there has never been so intimate a view from a First Lady's perspective.]] Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Booklist Review

Throughout her life, Jacqueline Kennedy was an enigma. Her refusal to give interviews in her lifetime only enhanced her mystery. But several months after President Kennedy's assassination, she sat down with historian Arthur Schlesinger to answer questions for an oral history that was not to be released until after her death (the actual amount of time it was to be delayed was surprisingly difficult to determine, as Caroline Kennedy explains in the foreword). The eight and one-half hours of conversation reveal a woman with insecurities (she once apologized to JFK for being a dud) who adored her husband and family and, surprisingly, especially perhaps to her, found a new and stronger marriage in the White House. Yet one gets the sense that Mrs. Kennedy always knew she was speaking for history, and she could spin with the best. Her praise for the president knows few bounds, and some of her comments, in retrospect, seem more like subterfuge than naivete (Did Kennedy really suggest she take all those out-of-town trips because of concern for her well-being?). That said, in hours of conversation with sounds of drinking and smoking in the background, it was difficult not to let some secrets slip. Jack's bad stomach is mentioned in a whisper. President Kennedy thought Richard Nixon was dangerous, she reveals, and she calls Indira Gandhi a truly bitter woman. It's in the discussion of Gandhi that Mrs. Kennedy goes off on liberal women and notes that she preferred an Asiatic relationship with her husband. As Caroline Kennedy notes, her mother evolved, but this snapshot in time fascinates. With so many events and figures mentioned that are only vaguely remembered if at all, historian Michael Beschloss does yeoman's duty providing context in footnotes that are as concise as they are useful. Packaged with 8 CDs containing the interviews, this deluxe edition may raise more questions than it answers. But wasn't that Jacqueline Kennedy?--Cooper, Ilene Copyright 2010 Booklist