Cover image for Lake of fire
Title:
Lake of fire
Publication Information:
[New York] : Thinkfilm ; Chatsworth, Calif. : Distributed by Image Entertainment, [2008]
Physical Description:
1 videodisc (152 min.) : sd., b&w ; 4 3/4 in.
System Details:
DVD, region 1, widescreen (1.85:1) presentation; Dolby Digital 2.0 stereo., digitally mastered.
Target Audience:
Unrated.
Language:
English
Language Note:
English subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing.
General Note:
Title from container.

Originally released as a motion picture in 2006.

Special features: trailer gallery; theatrical trailer.
Abstract:
A look at the subject of abortion where there can be no absolutes, no "right" or "wrong." Equal time is given to both sides, covering arguments from either extremes of the spectrum, as well as those at the center, who acknowledge that, in the end, everyone is "right" or "wrong."
Added Author:
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DVD HQ767.L354 2008 1
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Summary

Summary

With Lake of Fire, American History X helmer and music-video director Tony Kaye climbs inside of the decades-old abortion debate for a 152-minute study of the pro-life and pro-choice positions. In the process, he uncovers not an objective black-and-white issue, but a myriad of circumstances and sub-issues of tremendous moral complexity and ambiguity. He then investigates the sub-philosophies and ideas that belie each side, with generous input and assistance from socialist Noam Chomsky, and via interviews with Christian theologians, and professors of bioethics, sociology, and philosophy. Kaye also gives substantial consideration to the violence directed by certain extremists at abortion doctors, nurses, and clinics. The director worked on the picture for well over 15 years, and it serves as a prime candidate for the definitive abortion documentary. However, be forewarned: Lake of Fire includes lengthy, graphic depictions of abortion procedures and their physical and emotional side-effects, and it is not for the squeamish or suitable for younger audiences. ~ Nathan Southern, Rovi