Cover image for The mask
Title:
The mask
Uniform Title:
Mask (Motion picture : 1994)
Publication Information:
[United States] : New Line Home Entertainment, [2005]
ISBN:
9780780651357

9780790729978
Physical Description:
1 videodisc (100 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.
System Details:
DVD, region 1, widescreen presentation; Dolby Digital.
Target Audience:
MPAA rating: PG-13; some stylized violence.
Series:
New Line platinum series
Language:
English
Language Note:
English dialogue, English or Spanish subtitles; closed-captioned.
General Note:
Originally released as a motion picture in 1994.

Special features: "Return to Edge City"; "Introducing Cameron Diaz"--Screen test; "Cartoon Logic"; "What Makes Fido Run"; audio commentaries with director, writer, producer, VFX supervisor, animation supervisor, cinematographer; theatrical trailer.
Abstract:
A mild-mannered bank clerk becomes a superhero when he puts on a mystical mask.
Personal Subject:
Holds:

Available:*

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DVD MASK 1
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1:CTWAV MASK 1 .SOURCE. 11/17 H
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DVD MASK 1
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DVD MASK 1
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On Order

Summary

Summary

Hyperactive mayhem results when a mild-manned banker discovers an ancient mask that transforms him into a zany prankster with superhuman powers in this special-effects-intensive comedy. The wildly improvisational Jim Carrey plays Stanley Ipkiss, a decent-hearted but socially awkward guy who one night finds a strange mask. Carrey's trademark energy reveals itself after Stanley puts on the mask and the banker transforms into The Mask, a green-skinned, zoot-suited fireball. The rubber-faced Mask possesses the courage to do the wild, fun things that Stanley fears, including romancing Tina Carlyle (Cameron Diaz). In addition to Carrey's physical talents, the film makes effective use of digital visual effects that bestow the Mask with superhuman speed, insane flexibility, and popping eyes out of a Tex Avery cartoon. The larger narrative, involving the efforts of Tina's gangster boyfriend to destroy Stanley and use the mask's powers for evil, prove less interesting than the anarchic comic set pieces, including a particularly memorable dance number to "Cuban Pete." The film delivered enough laughs to become a surprise hit and, along with the same year's Dumb and Dumber, establish Carrey's status as a comedy superstar. ~ Judd Blaise, Rovi