Cover image for I want to live!
Title:
I want to live!
Uniform Title:
I want to live! (Motion picture : 1958)
Publication Information:
Santa Monica, CA : MGM Home Entertainment, [2002]
ISBN:
9780792852544
Physical Description:
1 videodisc (2 hr., 1 min.) : sd., b&w ; 4 3/4 in.
System Details:
DVD, NTSC; region 1; mono., Dolby digital; widescreen format.
Target Audience:
Unrated.
Language:
English
Language Note:
In English, with optional English, Spanish or French subtitles; Closed captioned.
General Note:
Based on newspaper articles by Ed Montgomery, and the letters of Barbara Graham.

Originally released as a motion picture in 1958.

Includes the original theatrical trailer.
Awards:
Academy Awards, 1958: Best actress (Susan Hayward).
Abstract:
A screen adaptation of the dramatic events in the life of a "B-Girl, " Barbara Graham, a vagrant prostitute and fast-living party girl, which led to a sensational murder trial and afterwards, her execution in the gas chamber despite growing doubts about her guilt. The background music is made up in its entirety of progressive jazz.
Holds:

Available:*

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1:CTWAV I WANT 1 .SOURCE. 8/09 AMZ
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DVD I 1
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Summary

Summary

Grim, almost unbearably intense, I Want To Live is the story of the life and execution of Barbara Graham (Susan Hayward) a perjurer, prostitute, liar and drug addict. The product of a broken home, Graham works as a shill, luring gullible men into crooked card games. She attempts to go straight, marries the wrong man, and has a baby. When her life falls apart, she returns to her former profession and is involved in a murder. Despite her claims of innocence, she is convicted and executed. Robert Wise directs the uniformly fine cast with grim efficiency, telling Graham's story in a series of adroitly crafted scenes that won him a well-deserved Academy Award nomination. However, the film belongs to Susan Hayward who gives a intense, shattering performance without one false note. Her performance is so grimly focused that she is, at times, almost unbearable to watch. The final scenes, which lead up to Graham's execution, are exhausting in their emotional intensity as the audience is spared nothing of Graham's agony, despair and desperation when she finally loses the long battle to save her life. Whether one sees Graham as a murderer or a hapless victim of society, the power and relentless, sordid reality of her story leaves an indelible memory in the mind of the viewer. ~ Linda Rasmussen, Rovi