Cover image for Lucas
Title:
Lucas
Publication Information:
México D.F. : FCE - Fondo de Cultura Económica, [2011]
ISBN:
9786071600783
Physical Description:
1 online resource (236 páginas)
Series:
Colección A través del espejo
Language:
Spanish
General Note:
Contiene índice.
Local Note:
Recurso electronico. Santa Fe, Arg. : e-libro, 2016. Disponible via World Wide Web. El acceso puede ser limitado para las bibliotecas afiliadas a e-libro.
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Summary

Summary

En Hale, una pequeña isla de apenas cuatro kilómetros de largo y dos de ancho, ocurre una historia de amor inusual pero conmovedora. Caitlin, una adolescente de 15 años, hija de un escritor viudo y alcohólico, descubre que su apacible vida ha dado un vuelco tras conocer a Lucas, un enigmático joven extranjero que parece venir de ninguna parte. Conforme crecen los sentimientos de Caitlin por Lucas, aumentan también las sospechas sobre él, sobre todo cuando un anciano tropieza a la orilla de la playa con el cuerpo de una chica acuchillada. Este libro ganó el premio de literatura juvenil en Alemania en 2006.


Reviews 6

School Library Journal Review

Gr 9 Up-This beautifully written allegorical tale by the author of Martyn Pig (Scholastic, 2002) stays with readers long after it ends. Set on an isolated island off Great Britain, the novel has it all-love, hate, sin, forgiveness and redemption, and a memorable title character. As Caitlin, 15, relates the events of the previous summer, she recalls with crystal clarity the moment when the mysterious boy appeared out of nowhere. His arrival precipitates a series of incidents that exposes the ugly underbelly of the seemingly idyllic setting. Lucas, 16, is enigmatic and direct, and has the uncanny ability to read people and predict their actions. He lives off the land, and doesn't seem to want or need anyone. The locals don't understand him, and they see him as a threat. Lucas rescues Caitlin from being raped by Jamie, a seemingly upstanding college guy who, with his gang of rowdy, beer-drinking buddies, spreads rumors and innuendoes about the stranger. The situation rapidly escalates into an accusation of attempted murder after one of the island girls is brutally attacked. A group of residents abandons rational thought and becomes a senseless mob, seeking vigilante justice. The writing is extraordinarily lyrical. The often-dreamlike quality of island life is juxtaposed with the ever-present threat of violence like the calm before a storm. All of the characters are sharply defined. Lucas, with his mixture of real and unearthly qualities, is unique and unforgettable. This is a powerful book to be savored by all who appreciate fine writing and a gripping read.-Sharon Rawlins, Piscataway Public Library, NJ (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publisher's Weekly Review

Brooks's (Martyn Pig) second novel is an ambitious and intricately crafted tale of love and resurrection that more than lives up to its eye-catching packaging. Growing up on a beautiful but isolated island off the English coast, narrator Caitlin, 15, is deeply ambivalent about the onset of adolescence. Surely growing up must mean something more than making herself "look like a tart" in skimpy outfits and throwing herself into a life of recreational drug use, like many of the island's other girls. At home, her kind alcoholic father (a YA author!) has been immobilized with grief since Cait's mother died in a car crash 10 years ago. When rootless Lucas comes to the island, to camp out and live off the land, he becomes Cait's friend and stirs her heart. Lucas arouses the suspicions of the insular islanders, who (thanks to the scheming of some nearly unbelievably brutish characters) come to believe that the boy is responsible for a violent sexual assault. Although the novel can be read on one level as an unfolding, tender relationship made all the more poignant by the mob violence that surrounds it, sensitive readers may grow to suspect that Lucas may be something more than just a boy wanderer. From the titles of Cait's father's novels (Some Kind of God; Nothing Ever Dies; New World) to Lucas's own comments ("You don't know my size"), teasing hints as to Lucas's mysterious background litter the narrative. Its powerful combination of big ideas and forthright narrative make this novel likely to linger in readers' minds. Ages 12-up. (May) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


Horn Book Review

(High School) Kevin Brooks (Martyn Pig) sets a young girl's coming-of-age in a lush romantic thriller, pitting good versus evil in a small island village off the coast of England. Caitlyn loves her home on tiny Hale island, whose wild beauty and dangers are made vivid through her intimate observations. The summer she is fifteen, Cait's childhood contentment is disturbed by the raucous activities of other young islanders, including her older brother and even her best friend, who tries to bring Cait along for ""a bit of fun."" Cait is repelled by their drinking, partying, and lewd behavior, but then she meets a beautiful, mysterious boy who is beyond all that, who seems beyond everything. No one knows where Lucas comes from or why he is here, and while his secrets feed Caitlyn's dreams, they also make him a perfect target for the small-minded villagers. There's nothing coy about the novel's intentions toward tragedy; the menace gathers as thickly as the storm clouds on the night Lucas is hunted down for a crime he didn't commit. Yet the four-hundred pages are well paced; the absorbing narrative alternates gentle scenes of tentative romance with gripping accounts of violence and fear. While the extremes of conflict and character push the parameters of YA realism, Caitlyn's overpowering feelings of love and loss will resonate with teen readers. (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. All rights reserved.


Guardian Review

Hale Island is separated from the mainland by a causeway known as the Stand. Caitlin McCann lives there with her father. Johnny McCann is a writer, still mourning the death of his wife, who was killed in a car accident some years before the action of the book begins. This tragedy is like a stone thrown into water: its ripples spread to every part of the narrative. Cait's elder brother Dominic is away at university, and the novel opens with Cait, her father and the wonderfully named Deefer, the dog (D for Dog), going to fetch him home for the long vacation. We are told what happens over the summer by Cait herself, detailing her own feelings and the events that have shaken the small community in which she lives. By the end of the book, you've been given such a clear insight into so many different characters that it's hard to believe you've just read a first-person account. The pace and mood are cleverly varied so that at no point does the reader find herself trapped or restricted by Cait's voice. Brooks also finds ways to describe the landscape and the weather that never appear false or intrusive. This is very important. The place in which things happen quite often dictates the sort of events they are. They couldn't occur in exactly the same way anywhere else. The distance and separation of the island from the mainland are symbolic as well as geographical, and the beach, the woodland and the marsh provide more than a physical location for sometimes violent events. Everything is so carefully described that you truly do feel you are there, as though Brooks has created a physical as well as an imaginary world for his readers to step into. The themes of the novel are familiar: the stranger as scapegoat; the stranger as a sort of Shane figure, an empowering presence which helps others to find the courage to go on. There are also hints that Lucas, the stranger in question, is on one level a kind of Christ figure, who brings understanding and love where before there was anger and guilt. On another level, it's a particularly moving and unusual love story. Lucas (who remains, thank goodness, mysterious even after the end of the book) appears to Cait on the Stand. He is beautiful. He is wild. He is gifted. He is enigmatic. Also, he is deeply hated by the boorish, drug-fuelled, bored and jealous oafs in the community and their unpleasant and sinister female sidekicks. When he is blamed for a sexual assault that couldn't possibly have taken place, a series of events is set in motion. By the time we reach the denouement, Cait is in love. Without giving away the ending, she and Lucas do not live happily ever after, but her relationship with her father is now on a better footing and the brother who so nearly went over to the baddies' side is now the person she needs him to be. This is Kevin Brooks's second novel. His first, Martyn Pig , was much praised by the critics. Lucas will only enhance his reputation. It's the sort of novel that prize-awarding juries like, but which will also appeal to readers: a book that not only keeps you turning the pages, but also has you wondering and questioning your first judgments of people and their relationships to one another long after you've come to the end of the story. It would make a terrific movie, too, and it's a great shame that the young James Dean isn't available to play Lucas, who is described as having "a way of walking that whispered secrets to the air". Adele Geras's Goodbye, Tommy Blue is published by Macmillan in February. Her adult novel, Facing the Light , is published by Orion in March. To order Lucas for pounds 10.99 plus p&p call Guardian book service on 0870 066 7979. Caption: article-lucas.1 The themes of the novel are familiar: the stranger as scapegoat; the stranger as a sort of Shane figure, an empowering presence which helps others to find the courage to go on. There are also hints that [Lucas], the stranger in question, is on one level a kind of Christ figure, who brings understanding and love where before there was anger and guilt. On another level, it's a particularly moving and unusual love story. Lucas (who remains, thank goodness, mysterious even after the end of the book) appears to Cait on the Stand. He is beautiful. He is wild. He is gifted. He is enigmatic. Also, he is deeply hated by the boorish, drug-fuelled, bored and jealous oafs in the community and their unpleasant and sinister female sidekicks. When he is blamed for a sexual assault that couldn't possibly have taken place, a series of events is set in motion. By the time we reach the denouement, [Cait] is in love. Without giving away the ending, she and Lucas do not live happily ever after, but her relationship with her father is now on a better footing and the brother who so nearly went over to the baddies' side is now the person she needs him to be. - Adele Geras.


Kirkus Review

In this bleak, ambitious story, tragedy ensues following the arrival on an English island of a wandering stranger named Lucas. Narrator Caitlin, 15, is attracted to Lucas, who camps out nearby, and she senses a mystical quality in him that is not explained, but must simply be accepted by the reader. As summer progresses, episodes pile up slowly and the air is charged with tension. Jamie, a rich teenager, nearly rapes Caitlin, then threatens Lucas and joins those falsely accusing him of a crime. While motivations aren't always clear, the ugly mood on the island is unmistakable and promises to end in violence, with a few surprising plot twists along the way. One can read this in allegorical terms, with the worst of modern life represented by Jamie and his mindless attacks on Lucas, who is aligned with nature. Readers who appreciate interesting symbolism and fine descriptive writing, and who like to sink into a long mood piece, will find this hard to put down. Admirers of Martyn Pig, however, will not find the same clever plot and dark humor. (Fiction. YA) Copyright ©Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Booklist Review

Gr. 8^-10. Brooks, author of Martyn Pig (2002), offers an-edge-of-the-seat story that has overtones of classics such as The Ox Bow Incident and To Kill a Mockingbird. Fifteen-year-old Cait lives on a small British island and knows from the moment she sees Lucas walking on the causeway that connects her home to the mainland that he will play a significant part in her life. A handsome, prescient young drifter, Lucas is tagged as a thief by the rougher elements on the island. Cait's college-age brother has begun hanging out with one of them--Oxford student Justin, who has a dark side. As Justin becomes a danger, and Lucas a blessing, both Cait and the reader feel the confluence of events building with an intensity that is almost painful. In a final scene, the extensive foreshadowing that has permeated the book builds to a terrible climax. It's not so much what Brooks writes about (sometimes the plotting is over the top), but the way he writes. There's a purity to his style that pervades the narrative, which is by turns sweet, taut, and terrifying. The relationship between Cait and her father has a reality and honesty that's affecting. Teens may pick this up for its sheer intensity, but once they put it down, they'll ponder its meanings. --Ilene Cooper