Cover image for Thief
Title:
Thief
Uniform Title:
Thief
Edition:
Special director's ed.
Publication Information:
Santa Monica, CA : MGM Home Entertainment, 2005.
ISBN:
9780792838944
Physical Description:
1 videodisc (approximately 124 min.) : sound, color ; 4 3/4 in.
System Details:
DVD; Dolby digital 5.1 surround; widescreen version (1.85:1); Region 1; NTSC.
Target Audience:
MPAA rating: R.
Series:
MGM DVD
Language:
English
Language Note:
In English with optional subtitles in English, French or Spanish; closed-captioned in English for the hearing impaired.
General Note:
Based on the book: The home invaders / by Frank Hohimer.

Originally released as motion picture in 1981.

Special features: Commentary by Michael Mann and James Caan; Theatrical trailer.
Abstract:
A professional thief is caught between Chicago organized crime families and corrupt police.
Geographic Term:
Holds:

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Summary

Summary

In Thief, James Caan plays Frank, a professional jewel thief who wants to marry Jessie (Tuesday Weld) and settle down into a normal life. In order to achieve his dream of a family, Frank--who is used to working solo--has to align himself with a crime boss named Leo (Robert Prosky), who will help him gain the money he needs to begin his domestic life. Frank plans to retire after the heist, yet he finds himself indebted to Leo and he struggles to break free. Thief is the first feature film from director Michael Mann and it seethes with his stylish, atmospheric direction. Though his cool approach may put off some viewers, it's a distinctive and effective story-telling approach, and Caan's performance ranks among his very best, making Thief a crime movie like few others. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, Rovi


Reviews 1

Library Journal Review

Ex-cons out for one final score rise above that heist-film cliche in this pair of movies. Jules Dassin's Rififi focuses more on methodology, highlighted by a half-hour, dialog-free safe-cracking scene. In his feature-film debut, Michael Mann (Manhunter; Heat) aims Thief toward character study, with a go-it-alone robber (James Caan) obsessed with having an ideal family life reluctantly financed by one big job for Da Man. Fatalistic endings wrap up both crime thrillers, offering the sort of trappings genre fans will appreciate. (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.