Cover image for Hegel and metaphysics  on logic and ontology in the system
Title:
Hegel and metaphysics on logic and ontology in the system
Publication Information:
Berlin, [Germany] : De Gruyter, 2016.

©2016
ISBN:
9783110427233

9783110424447

9783110424638
Physical Description:
1 online resource (244 pages).
Series:
Hegel-Jahrbuch Sonderband, Band 7
Language:
English
General Note:
"The thirteen essays here collected were first presented at the twenty-third meeting of the Hegel Society of America, held from October 31 to November 2, 2014 at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois."
Local Note:
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, MI : ProQuest, 2016. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest affiliated libraries.
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Summary

Summary

The collective focus of the essays here presented consists of the attempt to overcome the deadlock between metaphysical and non- (or anti-) metaphysical Hegel interpretations. There is no doubt that Hegel rejects traditional and influential forms of metaphysical thought. There is also no doubt that he grounds his philosophical system on a metaphysical theory of thought and reality. The question asked by the contributors in this volume is therefore: what kind of metaphysics does Hegel reject, and what kind does he embrace? Some of the papers address the issue in general and comprehensive terms, but from different, even opposite perspectives: Hegel's claim of a 'unity' of logic and metaphysics; his potentially deflationary understanding of metaphysics; his overt metaphysical commitments; his subject-less notion of logical thought; and his criticism of Kant's critique of metaphysics. Other contributors discuss the same topics in view of very specific subject-matter in Hegel's corpus, to wit: the philosophy of self-consciousness; practical philosophy; teleology and holism; a particular brand of naturalism; language's relation to thought; 'true' and 'spurious' infinity as pivotal in philosophic thinking; and Hegel's conception of human agency and action.