Cover image for Traumatic encounters Holocaust representation and the Hegelian subject
Title:
Traumatic encounters Holocaust representation and the Hegelian subject
Publication Information:
Albany : State University of New York Press, c2003.
ISBN:
9780791457993

9780791458006

9780791486382
Physical Description:
x, 236 p.
Language:
English
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Summary

Summary

Addresses the difficulty of representing the Holocaust in literature and on film.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

Eisenstein (Otterbein College) considers the problematics of Holocaust memorialization by counterpointing poststructuralist theorists' view that artistic representation should be considered "as the product of a limited, discursive, culturally specific, subject position" with a Hegelian perspective. In opposition to privileging a plurality of narratives, Eisenstein posits Saul Friedlander's and his own concerns about discarding belief in historical truth and representation and the ensuing danger of simplistic, apologetic, or untruthful accounts. The author's key for maintaining truth in bearing witness to the Holocaust is to "recover the 'totalizing' impulse repudiated by postmodern historiography and postmodern aesthetics." Trying to avoid the pitfalls of both liberal and deconstruction methodologies, Eisenstein calls for a reconsideration of the Hegelian insistence on "totality" as a means of bearing witness to Holocaust trauma, with ethical consequences for the way people recognize themselves as "knowing subjects." Following an extensive chapter on Hegel's thought and his critics, Eisenstein applies his theory in provocative close readings of Thomas Keneally's Schindler's List, D.M. Thomas's The White Hotel, Thomas Mann's Doctor Faustus, and David Grossman's See Under: Love. ^BSumming Up: Optional. Graduate students, researchers, and faculty versed in postmodernist theory, Holocaust representation, and Hegelian dialectics. S. L. Kremer emerita, Kansas State University