Cover image for Aristophanes and the carnival of genres
Title:
Aristophanes and the carnival of genres
Publication Information:
Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2007.
ISBN:
9780801885273
Physical Description:
x, 257 p.
Series:
Arethusa books
Language:
English
Contents:
Bakhtin, Aristophanes, and the carnival of genres -- Dikaiopolis on modern art -- The failed programs of Clouds -- Clouds on Clouds and the aspirations of Wasps -- Questioning authority : Homer and oracular speech -- The return of Telephus : Acharnians, Tesmophoriazusae, and the dialogic background -- The centrifugal style.
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Summary

Summary

The comedies of Aristophanes are known not only for their boldly imaginative plots but for the ways in which they incorporate and orchestrate a wide variety of literary genres and speech styles. Unlike the writers of tragedy, who prefer a uniformly elevated tone, Aristophanes articulates his dramatic dialogue with striking literary and linguistic juxtapositions, producing a carnivalesque medley of genres that continually forces both audience and reader to readjust their perspectives. In this energetic and original study, Charles Platter interprets the complexities of Aristophanes' work through the lens of Mikhail Bakhtin's critical writing.

This book charts a new course for Aristophanic comedy, taking its lead from the work of Bakhtin. Bakhtin describes the way multiple voices--vocabularies, tones, and styles of language originating in different social classes and contexts--appear and interact within literary texts. He argues that the dynamic quality of literature arises from the dialogic relations that exist among these voices. Although Bakhtin applied his theory primarily to the epic and the novel, Platter finds in his work profound implications for Aristophanic comedy, where stylistic heterogeneity is the genre's lifeblood.


Table of Contents

Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introduction: Bakhtin, Aristophanes, and the Carnival of Genresp. 1
1 Dikaiopolis on Modern Artp. 42
2 The Failed Programs of Cloudsp. 63
3 Clouds on Clouds and the Aspirations of Waspsp. 84
4 Questioning Authority: Homer and Oracular Speechp. 108
5 The Return of Telephus: Acharnians, Thesmophoriazusae, and the Dialogic Backgroundp. 143
Conclusion: The Centrifugal Stylep. 176
Notesp. 183
Bibliographyp. 239
Indexp. 251