Cover image for Hegel's conception of the determinate negation
Title:
Hegel's conception of the determinate negation
Publication Information:
Leiden, Nethelands : Brill, 2015.

©2015
ISBN:
9789004284609

9789004284616
Physical Description:
1 online resource (360 pages).
Series:
Critical Studies in German Idealism ; Volume 12
Language:
English
Local Note:
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, MI : ProQuest, 2015. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest affiliated libraries.
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Summary

Summary

"The determinate negation" has by Robert Brandom been called Hegel's most fundamental conceptual tool. In this book, Terje Sparby agrees about the importance of the term, but rejects Brandom's interpretation of it. Hegel's actual use of the term may at first seem to be inconsistent, something that is reflected in the scholarship. However, on closer inspection, three forms of determinate negations can be discerned in Hegel's texts: A nothing that is something , a moment of transformation through loss (like the Phoenix rising from the ashes), and a unity of opposites . Through an in-depth interpretation of Hegel's work, a comprehensive account of the determinate negation is developed in which these philosophically challenging ideas are seen as parts of one overarching process.


Table of Contents

Abbreviationsp. ix
Referencesp. x
Terminologyp. x
1 Introductionp. 1
1.1 The Problemp. 2
1.1.1 The Determinate Negation as Exclusion or "Material Incompatibility"p. 2
1.1.2 The Determinate Negation as Inclusionp. 9
1.1.3 Hegel's Inconsistent Use of the Termp. 10
1.1.4 The Root of the Problem and a Possible Resolutionp. 11
1.2 Overviewp. 12
Part 1 The Background to the Conception of the Determinate Negation
2 Kant's Doctrine of Determinationp. 19
2.1 Determination and Negation in Kantp. 20
2.1.1 Determination as Predicationp. 21
2.1.2 The Transcendental Prototyponp. 22
2.1.3 Kant on Negationp. 26
2.1.4 Affirmative Negation and the Infinite Judgmentp. 28
2.2 Real Oppositionp. 30
2.3 Dialectical Oppositions and the Limits of Human Knowledgep. 34
2.3.1 The Antinomies of KrVp. 34
2.3.2 The Antinomies of kup. 42
2.3.3 Intellectual Intuition and Intuitive Understandingp. 48
2.4 Seeds of the System of Transcendental Philosophyp. 50
2.4.1 Kant's Table of Categoriesp. 50
2.4.2 The Significance of the Third Categoryp. 58
2.4.3 Philosophical Knowledge in § 12 of KiVp. 60
2.5 Summaryp. 64
3 After Kant: Fichte and Schellingp. 66
3.1 The Quest for a System of Transcendental Idealism: Anti-Philosophy and Skepticismp. 66
3.1.1 Reinhold and the Anesidemus-Reviewp. 69
3.1.2 Fichte's Wissenschaftslehrep. 73
3.1.3 Schelling's System des transzendentalen Idealismusp. 77
3.2 Fichte and Schelling's Correspondence, 1800-1802p. 80
3.2.1 The Philosophy of Nature as a Necessary Complement to Transcendental Philosophyp. 81
3.2.2 The Absolute, the Limits of Idealism and the Method of Philosophyp. 83
3.3 Schelling's Philosophy of Identityp. 87
3.4 Summaryp. 89
4 Hegel in Jenap. 91
4.1 Hegel between Fichte and Schelling: Beyond Indifferencep. 91
4.2 Outlines of a System: From the Finite to the Infinitep. 94
4.2.1 From the Finite to the Infinitep. 96
4.2.2 The Concept of the Method in Systementwürfe IIp. 102
4.2.3 The Determinate Negation and the Connection of Knowledge to Lifep. 104
4.2.4 The Determinate Negation as Gestaltp. 110
4.3 The Determinate Negation in PhGp. 113
4.3.1 The Program and Method o/PhGp. 115
4.3.2 Skepticism in PhGp. 120
4.3.3 The Determinate Negation as an Answer to Skepticismp. 124
4.4 Summaryp. 129
5 Review and Outlookp. 131
Part 2 The Determinate Negation in the Science to Logic
6 Determinate Negation within the Program of WdLp. 137
6.1 The Need for a Reworking of Logicp. 138
6.2 The Speculative Determinate Negation and the Method of Logicp. 146
6.3 Summary and Preliminary Overview of the Speculative Determinate Negationp. 175
7 Determination and Negation in the Doctrine of Beingp. 181
7.1 The Beginning of the Logicp. 183
7.2 The Original Movement of Pure Thinkingp. 185
7.2.1 Determinacy as Indeterminacy: Beingp. 186
7.2.2 Indeterminacy as Determinacy: Nothingp. 187
7.2.3 Unifying the Contradictory: Becomingp. 190
7.2.4 The Dissolution of the Speculative Unity: The Transition to Daseinp. 193
7.2.5 Reflection on the Speculative Determinate Negationp. 194
7.3 Dasein: The Traditional, Dialectical and Speculative Framework of Determinationp. 196
7.3.1 The Traditional Framework Revisitedp. 197
7.3.2 Dialectical Determination: Something and Other, Limit and Finitudep. 199
7.3.3 Speculative Determination: The True Infinitep. 206
7.3.4 "wo in dem Widerspruch der Einheit zweier Bestimmungen und des Gegensatzes derselben verharrt wird"p. 209
7.4 Indeterminate and Determinate Negationp. 214
7.4.1 Indeterminate Negationp. 215
7.4.2 Determinate Negation as "Kälte, Finsternis und dergleichen bestimmte Negationen"p. 217
7.5 A Comment on the Principle Omnis Determinate est Negatiop. 219
7.6 Summaryp. 227
8 Determination and Negation in the Doctrine of Essencep. 229
8.1 The Logic of Essence in Generalp. 229
8.2 Essence as a Determinate Negationp. 231
8.3 The Determinations of Reflectionp. 234
8.3.1 Identity: Differencep. 234
8.3.2 Difference: Bringing the Unrelated Togetherp. 236
8.3.3 Contradiction: The Intensification of Oppositionp. 240
8.3.4 The Resolution of Contradiction: Into Nothing or Zero?p. 242
8.4 Problems of Contradiction in Hegel's Philosophyp. 245
8.4.1 What Exactly is Contradiction in Hegel's Philosophy?p. 246
8.4.2 Objective Contradiction, Negative Unity and the Reappearance of the Bad Infinitep. 248
8.5 The Logic of Essence and the Speculative Determinate Negationp. 253
8.5.1 How Can Something Negative be Positive?p. 253
8.5.2 On the Resolution of Contradiction into Abstract or Concrete Negationp. 255
8.6 Summaryp. 257
9 Determination and Negation in the Doctrine of the Conceptp. 259
9.1 Hegel's Doctrine of the Conceptp. 259
9.2 Hegel's Doctrine of the Concept in Relation to Kant'sp. 263
9.2.1 The Transcendental Unity of Apperceptionp. 267
9.2.2 Synthetic a Priori Judgmentsp. 268
9.2.3 Truthp. 271
9.2.4 The Ideap. 272
9.2.5 Intuitive Understandingp. 274
9.3 The Idea of Knowledgep. 278
9.3.1 Theoretical Knowledgep. 279
9.3.2 Practical Knowledgep. 288
9.4 The Speculative or Absolute Ideap. 290
9.4.1 The Speculative Idea in Generalp. 291
9.4.2 The Stages of the Methodp. 295
9.5 The Immanent, Necessary Progression towards Totalityp. 300
9.5.1 Immanencep. 301
9.5.2 Necessityp. 302
9.5.3 Totalityp. 308
9.6 Summaryp. 311
10 Conclusionp. 314
10.1 The Three Forms of the Determinate Negationp. 314
DN 0 : Material Incompatibilityp. 314
DN 1 : The Determinate Negation of the Doctrine of Beingp. 314
DN 2 : The Determinate Negation of the Doctrine of Essencep. 315
DN 3 : The Determinate Negation of the Doctrine of the Concept, the Speculative Determinate Negationp. 316
10.2 Summary of the Three Forms of the Determinate Negationp. 320
10.3 Hegel's Response to Fichte and Schelling on the Methodical Foundations of Philosophyp. 323
10.4 Hegel's Response to Kant's Framework of Determination and Negationp. 330
10.3.1 Determinationp. 332
10.3.2 Negationp. 333
10.3.3 Real Oppositionp. 337
10.3.4 The Antinomiesp. 338
Bibliographyp. 341
Indexp. 349