Cover image for Poetry as play Gongorismo and the Comedia
Title:
Poetry as play Gongorismo and the Comedia
Publication Information:
Amsterdam ; Philadelphia : J. Benjamins Pub., 1991.
ISBN:
9781556193040

9789027217615

9789027217622

9781556193057

9789027277732
Physical Description:
xviii, 260 p.
Series:
Purdue University monographs in Romance languages, v. 38
Language:
English
Added Corporate Author:
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Summary

Summary

During the Golden Age, poetry and drama entered into a dynamic intertextual and intergeneric exchange. The Comedia appropriated the different poetic currents prevalent during the Renaissance and also often enacted the controversies surrounding poetic language. Of particular interest is the influence of gongorismo on the comedia. Luis de Góngora himself experimented with dramatic form in his two little-known plays, Las firmezas de Isabela and El doctor Carlino . In his quest for effective dramatic language, Lope de Vega dramatized Gongorine language through both parody and respectful imitation. Calderón de la Barca, whose plays represent the culmination of Góngora's influence on Golden Age theater, transformed gongorismo into a rich, performative code that functions simultaneously as poetic discourse and dramatic convention.


Reviews 1

Choice Review

Luis de G'ongora was arguably the greatest Spanish poet of the 17th century. Although he wrote only one complete play and one incomplete one, his impact on contemporary verse drama (known as the comedia) was much more extensive than that modest production would suggest. Quintero offers a fine, close reading of G'ongora's own work in this genre and also demonstrates the indebtedness of Lope de Vega, Calder'on de la Barca, and others, to G'ongora's stylistic innovations. Her focus is primarily on language, largely eschewing more traditional thematic-structural analysis. The originality of the study lies in its exploration of the "multiple points of contact between lyric poetry and drama in the Baroque." This territory had been tentatively staked out by others, like Wardropper, but this is by far the most exhaustive study to date of Gongorine language in the comedia and, indeed, of poetic practice in general in that genre. Although the price seems exorbitant, it is an essential book for specialists in the poetry and/or drama of that time and belongs in any library serving undergaduate major and graduate programs in Spanish. J. A. Parr; University of California, Riverside