Cover image for Communists, cowboys, and queers the politics of masculinity in the work of Arthur Miller and Tennessee Williams
Title:
Communists, cowboys, and queers the politics of masculinity in the work of Arthur Miller and Tennessee Williams
Publication Information:
Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, c1992.
ISBN:
9780816621224

9780816621231

9780816684533
Physical Description:
xi, 204 p.
Language:
English
Added Corporate Author:
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Reviews 2

Choice Review

Savran links an odd couple in this investigation of the politics of masculinity in Arthur Miller and Tennessee Williams. His concept is alluring, its execution disappointing. One wants a well-integrated study of these playwrights, closely interwoven, revealingly comparative. Savran instead offers two separate considerations with little interrelationship, although he compares the two authors superficially in the book's early pages. A few times within the Williams chapters, Savran mentions Miller, largely in the context of the playwright's criticism of Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. Savran scarcely mentions Williams in the Miller chapter. Besides these limitations, Savran's style of writing is exasperating, overloaded with critical jargon. His frequent parenthetical insertions distract more than they inform. This book pales beside studies like Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick's Epistemology of the Closet (1991), Claude Summers's Gay Fictions, (CH, Feb'91), and John Clum's Acting Gay (1992). Lacking even is the most obvious unifying device: a concluding chapter to heighten the crucial comparisons and contrasts inherent in such a study. Index, bibliographical notes. Recommendation withheld.


Choice Review

Savran links an odd couple in this investigation of the politics of masculinity in Arthur Miller and Tennessee Williams. His concept is alluring, its execution disappointing. One wants a well-integrated study of these playwrights, closely interwoven, revealingly comparative. Savran instead offers two separate considerations with little interrelationship, although he compares the two authors superficially in the book's early pages. A few times within the Williams chapters, Savran mentions Miller, largely in the context of the playwright's criticism of Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. Savran scarcely mentions Williams in the Miller chapter. Besides these limitations, Savran's style of writing is exasperating, overloaded with critical jargon. His frequent parenthetical insertions distract more than they inform. This book pales beside studies like Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick's Epistemology of the Closet (1991), Claude Summers's Gay Fictions, (CH, Feb'91), and John Clum's Acting Gay (1992). Lacking even is the most obvious unifying device: a concluding chapter to heighten the crucial comparisons and contrasts inherent in such a study. Index, bibliographical notes. Recommendation withheld.