Cover image for My year of running dangerously : a dad, a daughter, and a ridiculous plan
Title:
My year of running dangerously : a dad, a daughter, and a ridiculous plan
Publication Information:
New York : Blue Rider Press, [2015]

©2015.
ISBN:
9780399175473
Physical Description:
271 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
Language:
English
Abstract:
"CNN correspondent Tom Foreman's remarkable journey from half-hearted couch potato to ultra-marathon runner, with four half-marathons, three marathons, and 2,000 miles of training in between; a poignant and warm-hearted tale of parenting, overcoming the challenges of age, and quiet triumph. As a journalist whose career spans three decades, CNN correspondent Tom Foreman has reported from the heart of war zones, riots, and natural disasters. He has interviewed serial killers and been in the line of fire. But the most terrifying moment of his life didn't occur on the job--it occurred at home, when his 18-year old daughter asked, 'How would you feel about running a marathon with me?' At the time, Foreman was approaching 51 years old, and his last marathon was almost 30 years behind him. The race was just sixteen weeks away, but Foreman reluctantly agreed. Training with his daughter, who had just started college, would be a great bonding experience, albeit a long and painful one. My Year of Running Dangerously is Foreman's journey through four half-marathons, three marathons, and one 55-mile race. What started as an innocent request from his daughter quickly turned into a rekindled passion for long-distance running--for the training, the camaraderie, the defeats, and the victories. Told with honesty and humor, Foreman's account captures the universal fears of aging and failure alongside the hard-won moments of triumph, tenacity, and going further than you ever thought possible."
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Book 796.4209 FOREMAN 1 .SOURCE. BT 11-3-15
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Summary

Summary

CNN correspondent Tom Foreman's remarkable journey from half-hearted couch potato to ultra-marathon runner, with five half-marathons, three marathons, and 2,000 miles of training in between; a poignant and warm-hearted tale of parenting, overcoming the challenges of age, and quiet triumph.


Reviews 2

Publisher's Weekly Review

Foreman, a CNN correspondent with 30 years of experience reporting from the field, follows his return to running at age 51, more than three decades after his time as a high school track athlete, in this sensitive, highly personal book about family, parenting, and the challenges of long-distance running. Urged to run a marathon with his 18-year-old daughter, he weighs the task of training for five half-marathons, three marathons, and one 55-mile race. The power of running soon enchants him. He writes of its "smooth interplay of energy, balance, and movement," preparing to win over his fatigue and burned muscles to cover the distance. Foreman, largely supported by his family and CNN colleagues, does not sugarcoat any of the difficulties of the races through mud, up steep hills, and over rocky terrain or unforgiving concrete, choosing to stress a proper diet of protein, fruits, vegetables, and fluids. Telling his story in chuckles and candid snippets, Foreman is a convincing salesman for running and its blessings of "exultation, beauty, joy, art." (Oct.) © Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.


Kirkus Review

The chronicle of a father's response when his daughter asked, "How would you feel about running a marathon with me?" Emmy Award-winning CNN correspondent Foreman did not utter the first words that came to mind: "Dear God, why?" Though he may have been an ex-marathoner, now in his early 50s, he writes, "my knees made stranger sounds when I climbed out of bed. You could play Foggy Mountain Breakdown' on the muscles in my lower back. I had the flexibility of a stepladder." However, prodded from deep inside his autonomous nervous system, he agreed. As the author quickly realized, a promise to a daughtera freshly minted aeronautical engineering studentwas not a thing to be taken lightly (even if she did). Foreman recounts the 16 weeks of training required to morph from someone with the "grace of a hog tossed from a train" to someone who can get back up and continue running after a nasty spill. Foreman's prose is as gladsome to read as a glass of cold lemonade after a brisk five miles. He stuck to the running plan, and within a few weeks, he writes, "even on days when the schedule called for rest, I found myself longing to run." The journey became bearable, even fun, though there were more than a handful of bumps in the road. The story climaxes with a grim, humorously rendered, 55-mile, cross-country slog, but the most colorful and lasting episode is the zydeco-accompanied minimarathon in New Orleanswhere Foreman had to rush to the medical tent to bandage his nipples and where the race volunteers dispensed martinis instead of water. Conversation with his daughter: "Should I grab [a martini]?...I'm pretty thirsty." "No." "Why? Because it'll slow me down to be drunk?" "Because you're eighteen." "This town is a riot." Even the author's long-suffering family had to admit at the end of the season that he was happier, and readers will enjoy running alongside him. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.