Cover image for Prince of the city
Title:
Prince of the city
Uniform Title:
Prince of the city (Motion picture)
Edition:
Two-disc special ed.
Publication Information:
Burbank, CA : Distributed by Warner Home Video, [2007]
ISBN:
9780790789835
Physical Description:
2 videodiscs (168 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.
System Details:
DVD, NTSC, region 1, widescreen (matted, enhanced) presentation; Dolby Digital mono., dual-layer.
Target Audience:
MPAA rating: R.
Language:
English
Language Note:
English or French (dubbed in Quebec) dialogue, English, French or Spanish subtitles; closed-captioned.
General Note:
Based on the book by Robert Daley.

Originally released as a motion picture in 1981.

Special features: New featurette "Prince of the city: the real story"; theatrical trailer.
Abstract:
New York cop Daniel Ciello (inspired by real-life undercover narcotics cop Robert Leuci) is involved in some questionable police practices. He is approached by Internal Affairs and in exchange for him potentially being let off the hook, he is instructed to begin to expose the inner workings of police corruption.
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Summary

Summary

Inspired by a true story, Prince of the City stars Treat Williams as a Manhattan detective who agrees to help the US Department of Justice weed out corruption in the NYPD. Williams agrees on the assurance that he'll never have to turn in a close friend. Wired for sound, Williams almost immediately stumbles upon a police conspiracy to smuggle narcotics to street informants in order to insure cooperation. While this might be condonable in a stretch, the fact is that the many cops are using the drugs on their own, and are also highly susceptible to bribes. Williams gets the goods on the miscreants, but in so doing he breaks the "code" and becomes a pariah to his fellow officers. As we learn in the unsettling final scene, Williams will always be considered a "fink," even by honest cops. Prince of the City is too long for its own good, but its opening expository sequences and its final twenty minutes more than compensate for the duller stretches. ~ Hal Erickson, Rovi