Cover image for Sun and moon, ice and snow
Title:
Sun and moon, ice and snow
Edition:
Pbk. ed.
Publication Information:
New York : Bloomsbury, 2009.
ISBN:
9781599907659
Physical Description:
1 online resource (328 p.)
Language:
English
General Note:
Includes a sneak peek of Princess of the midnight ball.
Abstract:
"Blessed, or cursed, with an ability to understand animals, the Lass (as she's known to her family) has always been an oddball. And when an isbjorn (polar bear) seeks her out, and promises that her family will become rich if only the Lass will accompany him to his castle, she doesn't hesitate. But the bear is not what he seems, nor is his castle, which is made of ice and inhabited by a silent staff of servants. Only a grueling journey on the backs of the four winds will reveal the truth: the bear is really a prince who's been enchanted by a troll queen, and the Lass must come up with a way to free him before he's forced to marry a troll princess."--Information provided by publisher.
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Summary

Summary

From bestselling author Jessica Day George comes a rich new fantasy, based on a Norwegian fairy tale, set in a land of eternal winter. Blessed--or cursed--with an ability to understand animals, the Lass (as she's known to her family) has always been seen as strange. And when an isbjorn (polar bear) seeks her out, and promises that her family will become rich if only the Lass will accompany him to his castle, she doesn't hesitate. But the bear is not what he seems, nor is his castle, which is made of ice and inhabited by a silent staff of servants. Only a grueling journey on the backs of the four winds will reveal the truth: the bear is really a prince who's been enchanted by a troll queen, and the Lass must come up with a way to free him before he's forced to marry a troll princess. Don't miss these other stories from New York Times bestselling author Jessica Day George: Silver in the Blood The Twelve Dancing Princesses series Princess of the Midnight BallPrincess of GlassPrincess of the Silver Woods The Rose Legacy series The Rose Legacy Tuesdays at the Castle series Tuesdays at the Castle Wednesdays in the Tower Thursdays with the Crown Fridays with the Wizards Saturdays at Sea Dragon Slippers series Dragon Slippers Dragon Flight Dragon Spear


Reviews 4

School Library Journal Review

Gr 7-10-Jessica Day George's retelling (Bloomsbury, 2008) of the Scandinavian fairy tale, Eat of the Sun, West of the Moon, begins with a lass whose poor family lives in the north where winter has refused to relinquish its icy grip for a very long time. The combination of the long winter, coupled with numerous mouths to feed, has left the lass unwanted by her waspish mother to a point where she wasn't even given a name. In return for accepting the challenging opportunity of going with an enchanted great white bear to an ice castle in the far north and living with him for a year and a day, her family is given riches. The bulk of the story involves the growing relationship between the bear and the lass and her gradual realization that the bear is under an evil troll enchantment. When disaster strikes, she and her pet wolf must enlist the aid of the four winds to defeat the trolls and rescue a young prince, who was the bear. The story is populated with an assortment of strange and sometimes terrifying creatures, and Jessica Roland does a superb job of creating a slightly different voice for each of them. A captivating fantasy.-John Clark, Hartland Public Library, ME (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Horn Book Review

This beautifully rendered retelling of a Norse fairy tale involves enchanted polar bears, a woodcutter's daughter who can talk to animals, and evil trolls. George's lyrical writing deftly handles exotic settings and poignant family relationships, resulting in a story of bittersweet sacrifice that's offset by flashes of humor. The protagonist is strong and courageous but humanly flawed. Bib., glos. (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. All rights reserved.


Kirkus Review

With spirit, energy and a puckish sense of humor, George weaves the "East o' the Sun and West o' the Moon" tale into a novel-length saga. The ninth child of an impoverished family, the Pika (girl) or Lass--for her mother will not even name her--grows into her gift of understanding the speech of animals under the tutelage and affection of her oldest brother Hans Peter. He has come from seafaring and is sad and wounded in his soul. When a white bear offers material comfort to the family in exchange for a year of the Lass's company, she accepts, although Hans Peter warns her off. She goes with her companion wolf Rollo to live with the bear in a palace of ice, served by gargoyles, fauns and selkies. A man sleeps in the Lass's bed each night but does not speak or touch her. Like Psyche, the Lass cannot resist trying to see him by candlelight and lo, he is the bear. The troll princess who has enchanted him takes him "east of the son and west of the moon." The Lass rescues her own bear prince, and her brother and his love and reveals her own name in a rousing and happy ending. Rich in Norwegian lore and perfectly delicious to read. (Fiction/fairytale. 10-14) Copyright ©Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Booklist Review

Unnamed and rejected by her mother, a girl (known as the lass) jumps at the chance to leave her meager home after a great white bear offers her a deal: if she accompanies him to his ice palace for a year and a day, he will reward her and her family with wealth. At the palace, she is waited on by an odd assortment of creatures, including salamanders and a selkie, but there are sinister undercurrents beneath the luxury, leading to a series of horrifying deaths. George has adapted Norse myths and fairy tales to create this eerily beautiful, often terrifying world in which animals talk, trolls marry humans only to destroy them, and weather forces are actual characters. Mystery, adventure, the supernatural, and a touch of love are woven together to create a vivid, well-crafted, poetic fantasy for readers who have enjoyed works by Robin McKinley and Esther Friesner or who are ready to move from Gail Carson Levine's fairy-tale adaptations to more sophisticated fare.--Bradburn, Frances Copyright 2008 Booklist